Automotive Glossary

Electronic Stability Program

Electronic Stability Program

ESP monitors the vehicle's response to the driver's steering and braking inputs to detect oversteer or understeer. If sensors detect that a skidding condition is developing, ESP brakes individual front or rear wheels and/or reduces excess power as needed to help keep the vehicle going in the direction the driver is steering. What does the ESP off switch do? The switch disables ESP's capability to reduce the engine torque. It also reduces the ESP intervention threshold to about 20%. How do I know ESP is working? The triangle in the center of the speedometer flashes when ESP intervenes; either with ESP switched on or off. It's a reminder to adjust your speed to the prevailing road conditions, usually by reducing it. If instead one "steps on it", with ESP ON, the engine power may be reduced to prevent a potentially critical situation. Electronic Stability Program (ESP®) The standard-fitted ESP® system selectively applies braking forces to the front and rear wheels in such a way as to reduce the risk of skids and slides and help the driver maintain control in critical situations. The system extends the technology of the anti-lock braking and acceleration skid control systems with a range of additional sensors which are used principally to detect yaw motion. The ESP® computer continuously compares the actual behaviour of the vehicle with the computed ideal values. The moment the car deviates from the direction intended by the driver, specially developed control logic causes the system to intervene with split-second speed to bring the car back on track. It does this in two ways: Precisely controlled braking at one or more wheels Reducing engine power. ESP® in this way helps to stabilise the vehicle in critical situations.

×
scroll up